Why is the Versa-Tech designed the way it is, such a departure from what we would normally see with the core standard recloser design?

When the Versa-Tech was first introduced into the marketplace in the summer of 2007, it was a very different type of product since it had an energized live tank device. At the time, this was really a departure from what was normally done with regards to the recloser design. This introduced a new school of thought to the industry, creating two schools of thought when it comes to recloser design-- one a dead tank and the other a live tank.

In the case of a dead tank recloser design, we have a high voltage switch cabinet, which typically is at the top of the pool. And that is tethered down into a control cabinet, which houses typically not only the brains of the device, but also the power to operate the device and any communications for remote access to the device. This cabinet, as well as the switch itself, must be grounded solidly. To satisfy the power requirements of the recloser control and operation, the control cabinet needs to have auxiliary power source such as a battery and external transformer. Thus, in such a scenario, we have a difference in potential between the switch and the control cabinet.

Unfortunately, there are times where a difference in potential, such as lightning storms, can become an issue. And it is not out of the ordinary for sensitive electronics, such as those found inside control cabinets for reclosers, capacitor banks, or load break switches, to be inoperable in those types of circumstances. This is simply because the electronics are in the path to ground, and they rely on transformer power and backup power to operate.

The departure from the norm with the Versa-Tech was to have the control function elevated to the same potential as the switch itself and rather than have a control cabinet that was tethered to ground at the base of the pole. This was achieved by incorporating the control inside the housing of the switch. So, now, both the switch and the control function are at the same potential as the system, which greatly reduces the effects of lightning. In other words, it increases the lightning immunity.

The dielectric failures also are reduced considerably because we have this bird on a wire concept in the case of the Versa-Tech. In addition to that, there is no external auxiliary power required because it is being power directly from the line current or fault current that is present at that given time. There is no need for a control cabinet to be placed at the base of the pole, much less being powered, as well.

The fact that there is less equipment to install makes the installation much quicker compared to conventional dead tank recloser. This also translates to system cost savings and reduction in time and even materials that need to be used for the installation.

Switching & Fusing

  1. Why is the Versa-Tech designed the way it is, such a departure from what we would normally see with the core standard recloser design?
  2. How much line current does the Versa-Tech need to operate?
  3. What are some of the differences between the Versa-Tech LT, Versa-Tech I, Versa-Tech II, and Versa-Tech XC?
  4. With regards to Versa-Tech's battery management, there have been various iterations of firmware that have been made available for different reasons and for different functions in the lifespan of the product lines. What are the different firmware versions of the Versa-Tech and which one should be used?
  5. In today's environment, how secure are Versa-Tech's WiFi settings?
  6. Will there be any additional curves or user modifiers available for the Versa-Tech?
  7. How do I determine the voltage rating of a fuse link?
  8. How do I determine the interrupt rating of a fuse link?
  9. What test reports are available for fuse links?
  10. Which is better a fast or a slow fuse link?
  11. Can CHANCE® fuse links withstand 150% of their rating continuously?
  12. Can I use a 65 A rated fuse link in a 200 A rated fuse holder?
  13. What is the difference between the solid head and removable head fuse links?
  14. Will CHANCE® fuse links work in all cutouts with arc shortening rods?
  15. Can we replace our 100 A rated fuse holder with the 300 A solid blade?
  16. Can I use CHANCE® fuse holders in the S&C cutout mounting assemblies?
  17. What is the Mechanical Assist Spring?
  18. What is the recommended torque for the terminal when connecting copper leads to a cutout?
  19. Do CHANCE® cutouts have bone fiber as the arc quenching material?
  20. What is an arc shortening rod?
  21. Can I use a 27kV 150 kV BIL cutout on a 34.5 kV system?
  22. What is the difference between the Link Break and Load Break cutouts?
  23. Does CHANCE® make a Dual Vent cutout?
  24. Does CHANCE® make a Fuse Link specifically for Transformer Protection?
  25. Is additional creep or leakage distance on cutout designs only necessary near coastal areas?
  26. Can cutouts be used anywhere on an electric distribution system?
  27. What is the voltage rating of the Type QH and Type STH fuse links?
  28. What is the interrupt rating of the Type QH and Type STH fuse links?
  29. What test reports do you have for Type QH and Type STH fuse links?
  30. Are there special applications for the Type QH and Type STH fuse links?
  31. Are there any unique installation requirements for the Type QH and Type STH fuse links?
  32. Will the Type QH and Type STH fuse links be available in both the Solid Head and Removable Head versions?
  33. Will the Type QH and Type STH fuse links work with the cutouts that have the Mechanical Assist Spring option?
  34. Will the Type QH and Type STH fuse links work in all cutouts with arc shortening rods?
  35. Will the Type QH and Type STH fuse links be suitable for use in Link Break and Load Break cutouts?
  36. Can I use the CHANCE Type QH and Type STH fuse links in 200A fuse holders?

Feedback and Knowledge Base